Plotting the Demise of Lecture Capture

Lecture capture isn’t what you think it is. Students think its a vehicle to allow them to watch lectures whenever they want, freeing them from the tyranny of the outdated, rigid classroom schedule. Faculty think it is a way to accommodate the needs of more students than the traditional classroom can meet. But lecture capture is really just a technology that allows everyone to act like they did before: faculty deliver lectures, students watch them and take tests about what they learned from these monologues. Lecture capture is a convenient enabler of the status quo. It challenges no one, not the faculty member or the student.  And that’s why it needs to die.

Once you realize what lecture capture is, you realize that creating something different doesn’t mean you should go back to small classes with faculty lecturing in front of students who dutifully attend 45 hours of class over 15 weeks.  Instead, you need a system that efficiently and effectively helps students master the basics while providing the room necessary for people to step outside their comfort zones and innovate in ways that promote student-faculty engagement and higher-order learning. You need an experience that demands something different out of everyone: the faculty as well as the students.  And, you need different kinds of technology in different kinds of physical space, with different kinds of class schedules to support that experience.

We have spent a fair bit of time over the past several months plotting the demise of lecture capture.  The new model will likely undergo significant revision over the next couple of years as we monitor its  progress and learn to tweak the system, but at its core is a combination of videos, adaptive learning technology and group exercises that facilitate the development of key competencies.  Faculty will become facilitators, not lecturers, and students will become active participants in their learning rather than passive consumers of content.  Students will be expected to show up five times rather than 30, and faculty will still be able to reach large numbers of students, just like with lecture capture. Three courses will use this new approach in the fall. If all goes according to plan, five more courses will debut with the new model in the spring of 2018 and five more in fall 2018. By spring 2019, all core and common course prerequisite courses will use the new model. Lecture capture will be gone. The college will be transformed and everyone will be more engaged in learning than ever before. Like many changes that seem scary and difficult at first, we’ll all look back in a few years and wonder why we didn’t end lecture capture sooner.

 

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2 thoughts on “Plotting the Demise of Lecture Capture

  1. I like the boldness of this statement: “The college will be transformed and everyone will be more engaged in learning than ever before.”

    On Mon, Jul 31, 2017 at 12:00 AM, Paul Jarley, Dean wrote:

    > Paul Jarley posted: “Lecture capture isn’t what you think it is. Students > think its a vehicle to allow them to watch lectures whenever they want, > freeing them from the tyranny of the outdated, rigid classroom schedule. > Faculty think it is a way to accommodate the needs of mo” >

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