Wow, That Was a Huge Failure…

At our 2014 Hall of Fame event, we featured a video of then Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley who is also CEO of Florida Hospital, Winter Park. The video starts out with Ken saying the following: “I came to UCF as a failure and left a success.” Ken had seen his dream to enter medical school dashed, but found his future at UCF. He has gone on to great things and now has doctors reporting to him! His achievements landed him in our Hall of Fame, a place where only 67 of our more than 55,000 alums have been recognized for their accomplishments.

Despite what helicopter parents think, everyone fails. It is part of life. A Knight should never fear failure. Getting comfortable with failure is a key step in becoming a better risk–taker and successful leader. That is why we celebrate failure and persistence in the college. Today, we begin the ninth installment of our Failure Competition.  Entering our competition is simple:

Write an account of a failure you have experienced in the past.  Your failure story has to focus on a new experience, a time you stepped out of your comfort zone: the farther the better. Tell us why this was such a stretch for you, the failure that resulted and what you learned from the experience that would be of interest to others.

While the Failure Competition began with students in our capstone class, it is now open to any UCF student on campus: undergraduate, graduate or EMBA, business, education, engineering or whatever. The only requirement is that you currently be enrolled at UCF.  Two semesters ago, we had a music student win the competition.

Need inspiration or guidance to tell your story? Search my blog. We have posted many stories about failure over the years.

Here are the ground rules, complete with important deadlines:

1. To enter you must post your essay in response to this blog. If you are a capstone student this semester include your section number and name of your instructor. If you are not in this class, tell me your class standing ( e.g., freshman, senior, graduate student) and your field of study. You must complete this exercise by 5 pm on Monday April 4th.

2. Instructors from the Capstone Course will then choose a winner from their section and explain why they chose the essay they did. A panel of College staff will choose no more than five finalists for me to consider from the rest of campus. I need these by 5 pm on April 11th.

3. Those winning entries are then sent to me. I will select three finalists by April 13th at 5 pm.

4. The finalists will be asked to submit short videos based on their essays. They must have those videos to me by 5 pm on April 20th.

5. I will then feature one video each day on my blog starting April 25th with a vote by everyone reading my blog taking place to determine the winner on Friday April 29th.

6. The winner will get a letter of recommendation from me along with a $500 prize. Second place will get $300, third place $200. These monies are awarded through our financial aid office.

Good Luck! Who knew failing could be this good?

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9 thoughts on “Wow, That Was a Huge Failure…

  1. Bashaar Zainal
    Integrated Business Program – Senior

    Eight Years of Failure

    Can you imagine failing at something for eight straight years (or 24 semesters)? That’s 2,920 days of straight failure. So, you might be asking yourself, “why not just walk away?” The truth is, I thought about quitting many times but I realized that failure is an inevitable and necessary ingredient for success.

    In 2007 I graduated at Gaither High School in Tampa. My grades were mediocre and my GPA was a fraction shy of getting the lowest tier of the Bright Futures Scholarship at the time. So I was on my own, financially speaking. I went to community college after high school because everyone knows that’s the next logical step. I started at Hillsborough Community College in August 2007. My parents were generous enough to pay for my college tuition because they believed in me. The problem was, I didn’t believe in myself. I skipped class, I never studied, and I didn’t want to study because I had other priorities. However, I wanted to make my family and parents proud. So I lied. I told them I was going to class. It made me feel better about myself and gave me an excuse to be out most of the day. You could say I was highly immature and you would be right.

    I continued to lie for two years. I’d sign up for classes, pay for the semester and then never show up. This irresponsible behavior finally caught up to me. In the fall of 2009, HCC decided that I wouldn’t be able to take anymore classes at their institution and they expelled me. The worst part about my expulsion was that I didn’t care. But let me tell you something – this behavior that led to my expulsion continues to haunt me to this very day.

    In 2010, my biological father that lives in Kuwait had given me a gift. He was able to convince the Ministry of Higher Education of Kuwait to grant me a full scholarship to any university in the United States. This would be a free ride. It even came with a stipend that included a monthly allowance to cover all of my living expenses so I could just focus solely on school. This was a dream come true! There was just one requirement – I had to study computer engineering. It was the program I was accepted in based on the engineering courses I took back in high school. How hard could engineering be? Now the challenge was finding a university to be admitted into with two previous years of straight Fs. Essentially a zero GPA. I reached out to Embry-Riddle Aeronautical and after multiple meetings in Daytona Beach explaining my situation, they gave me a chance.

    My first semester was stellar. I received very high marks. However, after the basic core classes, things started to go downhill. Engineering was no joke and my old bad behaviors were coming back. To top it all off, the majority of my peers were on a different playing field than I was. This saga also continued for two years. More Fs were being piled up to add to my disastrous collection. Finally I hit the wall again and was suspended from the university. My new scholarship was seized and I was in the same boat I was in earlier. This time the side of the boat said failure in multiple university colors.

    I decided to start over, again. I really struggled with this decision. I moved to Orlando to attend Valencia College. It was the perfect situation as my girlfriend had just received her AA and wanted to go to UCF. I planned to achieve an AA at Valencia and transfer with the Direct Connect Program. This would guarantee me admission into UCF. So I moved and started in 2013 and transferred the little credits I had. I was cruising through Valencia with great marks. I was even able to pull a few strings during this journey. I was given a chance to get my scholarship back! But there was a catch – I had to be a UCF Knight by spring 2014. This was time sensitive and nonnegotiable. This would mean that I would have to take 24 credits my fall 2013 semester to finish my AA. Not only that, I needed to earn almost all A’s to inflate my bleak GPA. If I passed all 24 credits but failed to raise my GPA to a 2.0, I would be denied my AA. Keep in mind that all this would have to happen while I was working. This is just part one of my Fs haunting me from the past.
    Challenge accepted. I took those 24 credits in one semester while working. I barely made it. At the end of it all I had hit a 2.01 and completed 60 credits for my AA. I earned my scholarship back and was ready for UCF! Before I could be admitted into UCF, I had multiple meetings with Undergraduate Admissions. Some courses counted while others didn’t. I turned in all my transcripts from previous institutions and UCF had a hard time adjusting my courses to accept me as a Knight but in the end, I was finally accepted into UCF!

    But here’s another twist. I had to major in engineering once again. The international scholarship was only valid if I was pursuing an engineering degree. I started at UCF in the College of Engineering my first semester. All those bad memories and behaviors came back. I had dug myself into a deeper hole. I had failed myself again! I began to doubt everything. Was college right for me? Am I doing something wrong? I was kicked out of two colleges at opposite sides of the state! Guinness Book of World Records anyone? Who does that? I had given up. I remember walking around campus feeling defeated and demoralized. I found a table to sit at to think about what to do next. It was at that table that I had my epiphany. I was asking myself the wrong question; college WAS right for me but I was going to college for everyone BUT me. I realized that the past four years of my academic career was driven by the need to satisfy everyone else. My family? Kuwait Scholarship? Engineering? I went to college to try to please everyone around me and majored in various programs that I had no real interest in. It never occurred to me to find the motivation that would drive my needs and wants. I realized that I didn’t just fail at academia, I failed myself for not pursuing what really made me happy. My grades, up until this point, were a reflection of the failure of not pursuing what I really wanted. Why was I even majoring in engineering in the first place? Because the scholarship said so? After asking myself these questions, I realized that the table I was sitting at was in BA2 of the College of Business. I had never been in this building. I started to look at the marketing that was plastered inside. There was one flyer that stood out.

    • Are you a great communicator?
    • Do you like working in teams?
    • Are you a critical thinker?
    • Are you a risk taker?
    • Maybe a Business Degree is for you!

    I remember it so vividly since I was the only one in the building. I told myself, let’s take that risk. My risk and nobody else’s. Let’s drop engineering and the scholarship. Let’s pursue a business degree. Maybe this is for me?

    I had dropped engineering and the scholarship and now I wanted to become a business professional. To make a long story short, I messed up my first semester in the College of Business. Yeah I’m an idiot. More Fs to add to my GPA. Fantastic. So what do I do now? I couldn’t use grade forgiveness because I used them all getting into UCF. I started in the College of Business with a COB GPA of 0.5 and a UCF Cumulative GPA of 1.85 in the fall term of 2014. The saga continues. Again I am being haunted by my previous Fs. It’s the cause of why my cumulative GPA is so low. Not to mention that now I was under Academic Probation. I would have to make a 2.0 every term until my cumulative GPA raised to a 2.0. I cruised through spring 2015 and summer 2015 with decent marks. I was still under Academic Probation.

    In the fall of 2015, I was introduced to something called Lack of Progress. Even though I was passing all my classes, my cumulative GPA and COB GPA were below a 2.0. The ultimatum was that if I didn’t raise both GPAs to a 2.0 or above, I would be kicked out of the College of Business. I was baffled as I was making progress but under “Lack of Progress.” It was the craziest oxymoron imaginable. By the end of the summer 2015 term, my COB GPA was a 1.55 and UCF Cumulative was a 1.92. I needed nearly a 3.4 in my fall 2015 semester to make this happen. I promise you I never worked so hard in my entire life. My second home was the College of Business. I ended the semester with a term GPA of 3.36 raising both my Cumulative GPA and COB GPA above a 2.0. My best semester yet.

    I was accepted into the College of Business’s Integrated Business Program. A program that focuses on traits that I proudly possess and can build upon. The Integrated Business Program also allows me to focus my studies on every aspect in the College of Business instead of just one. Making me a force to be reckoned with. As of today, I have signed up for the rest of my classes up until graduation. My commencement will be in December of 2016. I finally found my niche. I’m finally doing something that I enjoy. My grades have been so stellar up to this point that my international scholarship has taken notice. They are offering to change my major from engineering to business. This is something that is never done as they only select a certain number of students to study certain programs.

    My journey is finally coming to an end. Sometimes it takes people their whole life to find their calling. For me it took eight years of failure. Eight years of failure in academia. Eight years of failure of trying to make others happy. Eight years of failure to realize that I needed to go to college for myself and no one else. I hope my story inspires others that have dug themselves into a deep hole. Hopefully yours will never be as deep as mine. But I promise you one thing – there is always something to gain from failure and you should know that failure is inevitable. It’s how you come out of your failures that can lead you to the paths of success.

    Thank you for reading my story.

  2. Jennifer Ulmer
    BSBA Finance – Junior, 2nd Degree Seeking

    I graduated from UCF in 2007 with a degree in Psychology. I was an excellent student, Dean’s List most semesters, graduated Magna Cum Laude with Honors. How I made my way back to UCF studying Finance is another story, but it starts with the decisions I made, and didn’t make nearly 10 years ago.

    I studied Psychology because I loved my AP Psych class in high school. I knew that I would need to attend graduate school and figured I would decide on a career later. I knew I wanted to help people, and that was enough for me. First failure, not doing more in college to research and test-drive careers. Eventually I settled on the idea that I would become a social worker, and needed to get my Master’s degree.

    I applied to the University of Chicago, University of Michigan, and Washington University in St. Louis. They are the top schools in the country for social work. I didn’t apply to UCF because I didn’t want to give myself the opportunity to play it safe and stay in Orlando.

    To understand how big this was for me, applying to out of state schools, I was born and raised in Orlando. Went to local schools, and lived in the same house my whole life. My parents still own and live in the house I was raised in. I wasn’t much for change. I knew the only way I would ever get out of Orlando was to apply to graduate school out of state, and I really wanted to experience living in another city. In all honesty, I spent more time researching graduate schools, when I should have spent more time researching careers.

    I found out that I was accepted to all three schools, all with partial scholarships to cover tuition. I decided on University of Chicago. My parents immediately began telling any person who would listen about their daughter moving to Chicago for graduate school. I even secured a job via phone interview in the college Career Center. Everything was falling into place, or so I thought.

    My lease in Orlando was up in June, so I moved to Chicago early. Packing and driving a U-Haul from Orlando to Chicago was an experience. My parents insisted they come along, even though my high-school sweetheart, now husband (whom I married right after graduation) was with me the whole way.

    The first night in Chicago, with my parents driving back home, I felt a mix of emotions. I was excited, anxious, and felt alone. I was lucky to have my husband, but I missed my friends.

    Once settled, I spent my time wandering the city, and even met people in my apartment building. September rolled around and it was finally time to gear up for class. The weeklong full-time orientation was overwhelming. I kept hearing about “social work boot camp”. Upperclassmen would warn us during breaks to start reading for classes now, or else. I came home each night with a gnawing dread that something wasn’t right. I knew what it was, but didn’t want to admit it to myself.

    I didn’t want to be a social worker, and I didn’t want to be at UChicago.

    Had I spent more time researching possible careers, I would’ve known this wasn’t the right move for me. I think I knew it all along. But I ignored that voice and pressed on. I couldn’t ignore it anymore.

    One of the hardest, yet one of the best decisions I ever made, was walking into the Dean’s office that Friday to tell her I wanted to withdraw. We talked and I cried, a lot. I felt guilty. I felt like a failure.

    Then I had to call my parents and break the news.

    After a few weeks everything was packed into a U-haul and we moved back to Florida.

    I think one of the greatest lessons in life is to know when to quit. Part of accepting failure and learning from it is understanding when something isn’t working. I think everyone knows the power of perseverance; but at what cost? I could have continued. I would have done well in school. But I would’ve burned out after a few years as a social worker and not been any closer to the career I wanted. While I was grappling with the decision to stay or leave, a friend told me, “You can do anything, the question is, do you want to?”

    It is noble to continue to try, and keep working toward a goal. You shouldn’t give up because something is difficult. However, it is also noble to acknowledge that the goal is not the right fit and move on. My failure was not leaving UChicago, but in not spending more time outside of class to discover who I am and what I wanted out of my life and my career.

    Since then, I’ve spent time to explore careers, with many false starts, and finally figured out what I enjoy and what I want to do, and it’s led me back to UCF to study Finance.

    Now that I’m back, you can bet I won’t make the same mistake twice.

  3. How I Overcame Failing the Most Important Person in My Life.

    Integrity has always been a key value in my life. I hold myself to high moral expectations, and try to live an honest life. I pride myself in having good character and doing the right thing, and I also expect others to do the same. Doing the right thing without recognition is something I am a strong proponent for. There doesn’t need to be a Facebook post for every good thing you do. If you live a life of integrity you should feel fulfilled enough without the attention.

    In high school I was always busy playing a sport or working. I was the strongest and most independent person I knew. I had great friends and a supportive family. I lived the perfect white picket fence life, and I knew I deserved someone who would have the same strong morals as I did. I promised myself I would never lower my standards, or allow someone to treat me badly. I was sure of my self-worth and had all the confidence in the world at that time in my life. Sadly during my first few years at UCF I came to the realization that not everybody lives a life of morality and truthfulness. “Treat others how you expect to be treated” isn’t always reciprocated.

    Growing up I never experienced or even witnessed any type of abuse or violence. Abuse only happened to pathetic girls in my mind. I believed my standards were too high to fall under the spell of an abuser, but in reality you don’t even realize it’s happening. My perception that only weak people get abused was completely unrealistic. I also didn’t believe in emotional abuse, to me you needed a bruise to prove you were being hurt. These close-minded ideals lead me down a very dangerous path.

    He was six years older than I was, which caused me to swoon. He was always the center of attention and had that “bad boy” reputation. I didn’t realize he had an addiction until about 6 months in, and by then I was in too deep. He manipulated me to the point where I didn’t recognize the person I had become. The girl who believed in honesty and moral righteousness was gone. I let my self worth disappear. The girl I had been in high school was no longer there.

    Taking care of an alcoholic was a full time job. He constantly asked for money and favors and I felt like it was my job to provide that. My nurturing character felt like I was doing the right thing. I couldn’t abandon someone who was in crisis. So I stayed. I stayed after the infidelity. I stayed after the physical altercations and the threats. Sadly I let this continue for two years. The physical abuse only occurred when alcohol was involved, and I continuously used that as an excuse. In my mind the emotional abuse was the most significant though. I was in denial for most of the relationship, and I couldn’t even admit to myself that it was abuse. The manipulating and the threats really started to take a toll on every aspect of my life, including school and work. My goals had completely disappeared along with my ambition. My only goal was to tend to him, and my personal dreams were set aside. I was not involved with anything at UCF, and it always made me sad seeing my friends at events on campus.

    I finally woke up one morning and decided I was no longer going to be the victim. I was no longer going to put my dreams on hold for another person. It was time to reclaim my worth. After a breakup involving the police and a mental hospital I was finally free. I was ready to try to pick back up where I left off. Discovering myself again was one of the hardest things I had ever attempted to do. I wanted to become the girl I was in high school again, but in reality that was no longer possible. After months of healing I realized that maybe I couldn’t be the “old me”, but I could definitely be a “better me”! That’s exactly what I did.

    I let down many people when I kept choosing him. I let down countless friends and family, as they only wanted better for me. The person I failed the most was myself, and that is probably the hardest thing I have ever had to admit. I allowed someone to be in my life that didn’t respect or value me. I let my own self worth deteriorate. It’s one thing to fail another person, but failing yourself is a very hard thing to forgive. I have spent the last year really self-reflecting and have realized I can control who I allow to be in my life. I am proud to say that I have finally forgiven myself. In the end I am only human and life comes with many failures and successes. By living through this failure I have learned more about myself than I ever could have imagined and became a stronger person.

    Currently I am the happiest I have been in years. Everyday I focus on myself and my goals. I got accepted into the College of Business, secured two internships and had a few job offers. I spend time getting involved on campus and even joined a club. I also spend time with friends again and have a better relationship with my family. Life finally seems to be going in the right direction again. For anybody that is in a similar situation this is a quote I live by “Your value doesn’t decrease based on someone’s inability to see your worth.”

    – Alex

  4. Alex Berlo
    Integrated Business Major – Junior

    How I Overcame Failing the Most Important Person in My Life

    Integrity has always been a key value in my life. I hold myself to high moral expectations, and try to live an honest life. I pride myself in having good character and doing the right thing, and I also expect others to do the same. Doing the right thing without recognition is something I am a strong proponent for. There doesn’t need to be a Facebook post for every good thing you do. If you live a life of integrity you should feel fulfilled enough without the attention.

    In high school I was always busy playing a sport or working. I was the strongest and most independent person I knew. I had great friends and a supportive family. I lived the perfect white picket fence life, and I knew I deserved someone who would have the same strong morals as I did. I promised myself I would never lower my standards, or allow someone to treat me badly. I was sure of my self-worth and had all the confidence in the world at that time in my life. Sadly during my first few years at UCF I came to the realization that not everybody lives a life of morality and truthfulness. “Treat others how you expect to be treated” isn’t always reciprocated.

    Growing up I never experienced or even witnessed any type of abuse or violence. Abuse only happened to pathetic girls in my mind. I believed my standards were too high to fall under the spell of an abuser, but in reality you don’t even realize it’s happening. My perception that only weak people get abused was completely unrealistic. I also didn’t believe in emotional abuse, to me you needed a bruise to prove you were being hurt. These close-minded ideals lead me down a very dangerous path.

    He was six years older than I was, which caused me to swoon. He was always the center of attention and had that “bad boy” reputation. I didn’t realize he had an addiction until about 6 months in, and by then I was in too deep. He manipulated me to the point where I didn’t recognize the person I had become. The girl who believed in honesty and moral righteousness was gone. I let my self worth disappear. The girl I had been in high school was no longer there.

    Taking care of an alcoholic was a full time job. He constantly asked for money and favors and I felt like it was my job to provide that. My nurturing character felt like I was doing the right thing. I couldn’t abandon someone who was in crisis. So I stayed. I stayed after the infidelity. I stayed after the physical altercations and the threats. Sadly I let this continue for two years. The physical abuse only occurred when alcohol was involved, and I continuously used that as an excuse. In my mind the emotional abuse was the most significant though. I was in denial for most of the relationship, and I couldn’t even admit to myself that it was abuse. The manipulating and the threats really started to take a toll on every aspect of my life, including school and work. My self-worth had completely disappeared along with my ambitions. My only goal was to tend to him, and my personal dreams were set aside. I was not involved with anything at UCF, and it always made me sad seeing my friends at events on campus.

    I finally woke up one morning and decided I was no longer going to be the victim. I was no longer going to put my dreams on hold for another person. It was time to reclaim my worth. After a breakup involving the police and a mental hospital I was finally free. I was ready to try to pick back up where I left off. Discovering myself again was one of the hardest things I had ever attempted to do. I wanted to become the girl I was in high school again, but in reality that was no longer possible. After months of healing I realized that maybe I couldn’t be the “old me”, but I could definitely be a “better me”! That’s exactly what I did.

    I let down many people when I kept choosing him. I let down countless friends and family, as they only wanted better for me. The person I failed the most was myself, and that is probably the hardest thing I have ever had to admit. I allowed someone to be in my life that didn’t respect or value me. I let my own self worth deteriorate. It’s one thing to fail another person, but failing yourself is a very hard thing to forgive. I have spent the last year really self-reflecting and have realized I can control who I allow to be in my life. I am proud to say that I have finally forgiven myself. In the end I am only human and life comes with many failures and successes. By living through this failure I have learned more about myself than I ever could have imagined and became a stronger person.

    Currently I am the happiest I have been in years. Everyday I focus on myself and my goals. I got accepted into the College of Business, secured two internships and had a few job offers. I spend time getting involved on campus and even joined a club. I also spend time with friends again and have a better relationship with my family. Life finally seems to be going in the right direction again. For anybody that is in a similar situation this is a quote I live by “Your value doesn’t decrease based on someone’s inability to see your worth.”

  5. Alex Berlo
    Integrated Business Major – Junior

    How I Overcame Failing the Most Important Person in My Life.

    Integrity has always been a key value in my life. I hold myself to high moral expectations, and try to live an honest life. I pride myself in having good character and doing the right thing, and I also expect others to do the same. Doing the right thing without recognition is something I am a strong propionate for. There doesn’t need to be a Facebook post for every good thing you do. If you live a life of integrity you should feel fulfilled enough without the attention.

    In high school I was always busy playing a sport or working. I was the strongest and most independent person I knew. I had great friends and a supportive family. I lived the perfect white picket fence life, and I knew I deserved someone who would have the same strong morals as I did. I promised myself I would never lower my standards, or allow someone to treat me badly. I was sure of my self-worth and had all the confidence in the world at that time in my life. Sadly during my first few years at UCF I came to the realization that not everybody lives a life of morality and truthfulness. “Treat others how you expect to be treated” isn’t always reciprocated.

    Growing up I never experienced or even witnessed any type of abuse or violence. Abuse only happened to pathetic girls in my mind. I believed my standards were too high to fall under the spell of an abuser, but in reality you don’t even realize it’s happening. My perception that only weak people get abused was completely unrealistic. I also didn’t believe in emotional abuse, to me you needed a bruise to prove you were being hurt. These close-minded ideals lead me down a very dangerous path.

    He was six years older than I was, which caused me to swoon. He was always the center of attention and had that “bad boy” reputation. I didn’t realize he had an addiction until about 6 months in, and by then I was in too deep. He manipulated me to the point where I didn’t recognize the person I had become. The girl who believed in honesty and moral righteousness was gone. I let my self worth disappear. The girl I had been in high school was no longer there.

    Taking care of an alcoholic was a full time job. He constantly asked for money and favors and I felt like it was my job to provide that. My nurturing character felt like I was doing the right thing. I couldn’t abandon someone who was in crisis. So I stayed. I stayed after the infidelity. I stayed after the physical altercations and the threats. Sadly I let this continue for two years. The physical abuse only occurred when alcohol was involved, and I continuously used that as an excuse. In my mind the emotional abuse was the most significant though. I was in denial for most of the relationship, and I couldn’t even admit to myself that it was abuse. The manipulating and the threats really started to take a toll on every aspect of my life, including school and work. My goals had completely disappeared along with my ambition. My only goal was to tend to him, and my personal dreams were set aside. I was not involved with anything at UCF, and it always made me sad seeing my friends at events on campus.

    I finally woke up one morning and decided I was no longer going to be the victim. I was no longer going to put my dreams on hold for another person. It was time to reclaim my worth. After a breakup involving the police and a mental hospital I was finally free. I was ready to try to pick back up where I left off. Discovering myself again was one of the hardest things I had ever attempted to do. I wanted to become the girl I was in high school again, but in reality that was no longer possible. After months of healing I realized that maybe I couldn’t be the “old me”, but I could definitely be a “better me”! That’s exactly what I did.

    I let down many people when I kept choosing him. I let down countless friends and family, as they only wanted better for me. The person I failed the most was myself, and that is probably the hardest thing I have ever had to admit. I allowed someone to be in my life that didn’t respect or value me. I let my own self worth deteriorate. It’s one thing to fail another person, but failing yourself is a very hard thing to forgive. I have spent the last year really self-reflecting and have realized I can control who I allow to be in my life. I am proud to say that I have finally forgiven myself. In the end I am only human and life comes with many failures and successes. By living through this failure I have learned more about myself than I ever could have imagined and became a stronger person.

    Currently I am the happiest I have been in years. Everyday I focus on myself and my goals. I got accepted into the College of Business, secured two internships and had a few job offers. I spend time getting involved on campus and even joined a club. I also spend time with friends again and have a better relationship with my family. Life finally seems to be going the in the right direction again. For anybody that is in a similar situation this is a quote I live by “Your value doesn’t decrease based on someone’s inability to see your worth.”

    – Alex

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